Category : News

Lisa Rolph-Smith, Ambrose Branch

Meet our Fabulous Facilitator from the Capricornia Division of the QCWA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mrs Lisa Rolph-Smith, President, Ambrose Branch, QCWA

The Queensland Country Women’s Association when thought about, most people have a image that pops into their head of old ladies, tea and scones. I know I did until I walked into my local CWA to hire the hall for a playgroup disco. Membership numbers had dwindled in the branch, and they were facing closure as many other branches had throughout Queensland. A wave of concern and determination hit me. I grew up in the country and I worked in the cattle industry for most of my career life. The CWA was a association for me and all the women in our community, so with that I was on a mission!

Off I went to rally friends and community members to join -the response was amazing. After being a member for a short time I was asked to be Branch President and I was honored to accept. Now this is when I really came to understand the QCWA MISSON: Empowering and Inspiring women Though Friendship, Education, Service and Advocacy.

At the first Division meeting I attended I was introduced to a program called Country Kitchens, a partnership between the QCWA and the Queensland Government. The program endeavors to support QCWA Branch members to provide nutrition education and cooking skills in health promoting community activities  across rural, remote and regional Queensland. I signed up straight away to be a Facilitator and yet again I felt that determination to share this program with my community. Off I went to the local school where we were welcomed to run Country Kitchens cooking classes and we haven’t looked back!

 

[caption id="attachment_6976" align="alignleft" width="300"] Lisa with Michelle Cameron and Suellen Tappenden after a solo HONW-FT[/caption] [caption id="attachment_6977" align="alignright" width="300"] Lisa with Rachael (Nutritionist from Country Kitchens) and participants from their first HONW-FT[/caption] [caption id="attachment_6978" align="alignleft" width="300"] Lisa raising awareness of sugar in your drinks[/caption] [caption id="attachment_6979" align="alignright" width="300"] Country Kitchens healthy sausage rolls for the Mt Larcom brunch[/caption] [caption id="attachment_6966" align="alignnone" width="300"] Cauliflower and Zucchini Scones[/caption]

 

Top 3 Ways to Achieve Good Gut Health

Everyday is a good day to raise awareness of Australia’s second deadliest cancer. Helping to raise funds to support research, prevention, early diagnosis and quality treatment of bowel cancer is something we can all do to help. Did you know that our body contains millions of bacteria and microbes – in fact, we are 90% bacterial cells and 10% human cells. Many of these bacteria (our microbiome) provide health benefits; help us to digest fibre in foods; and produce a wide range of enzymes, chemicals, hormones and vitamins. Good gut health creates a healthy environment for  cells in your bowel and boosts your immune response which reduces your risk of bowel cancers and the effect of diseases such as Crohn’s and Colitis.

[caption id="attachment_6868" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Intestinal microbiome, bacteria colonizing different parts of digestive system, Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Enterococcus and Escherichia coli, 3D illustration[/caption]

Country Kitchens recommends the top three ways to achieve a healthy gut are:

  1. Increasing the dietary fibre in your diet

Consuming a plant-based diet, high in fibre is the best way to achieve good gut health such as the Mediterranean Diet. The Australian Dietary Guidelines recommend a diet that includes a variety of nutritious foods from the five food groups to reduce the risk of chronic disease and some cancers. Foods such as: vegetables with skin on, fruit with skin on, wholegrain cereals and beans contain high fibre. Studies show that people who eat more dietary fibre, have a more diverse microbiome which is beneficial for gut health. According to the National Health and Medical Research Council, we need to consume 25-30g fibre each day. We detail how much fibre is in certain foods in our Good Gut Health resource, found on our website at https://bit.ly/323jysx

[caption id="attachment_6867" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Health food concept with legumes, grains, seeds and organic vegetables.[/caption]

2. Including Probiotics and Prebiotics

Introducing probiotics (such as: fermented vegetables, yoghurt, kefir, bananas, onions and garlic) and prebiotics to your diet is also recommended. Prebiotics are the functional non-digestible food components (eg. fibre) that stimulate activity or the growth of beneficial bacteria. It is also recommended to reduce saturated fats, added sugars, processed foods and alcohol in your diet for good gut health.

[caption id="attachment_6869" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Fermented preserved vegetables in jar.[/caption]

3. Consume all three types of dietary fibre

  • Soluble: helps manage blood cholesterol and blood glucose, helps restore good bacteria and repairs colonic epithelium. Found in: oats, artichokes, leeks, onions, garlic, bananas, legumes, lentils, peas and miso.
  • Insoluble: keeps stools soft and bulky, assists with diverticular disease, haemorrhoids, constipation and bowel cancer. Found in: wholegrain cereals, nut, seeds, brown rice, corn, vegetables with skin on, fruit with skin on.
  • Resistant starch: consumed by good bacteria and helps keep the bowel lining healthy. Found in: unripe banana, cooked and cooled potatoes and pasta, lentils and plantain.

To find out more and access our Good Gut Health resource and healthy recipes, visit: https://bit.ly/323jysx

References:

https://www.eatforhealth.gov.au/guidelines/about-australian-dietary-guidelines

https://www.bowelcanceraustralia.org/bowel-cancer-awareness-month

NHMRC, 2005, Nutrient Reference Values for Australia and New Zealand including Recommended Dietary Intakes, Dietary Fibre, Commonwealth of Australia, 2006.

Olendzki, BC, Silverstein, TD, Persuitte, GM, Ma, Y, Baldwin, KR & Cave, D 2014, ‘An anti-inflammatory diet as treatment for inflammatory bowel disease: a case series report’, Nutrition Journal, vol. 13, no. 5, pp. 1-7.

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